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My commute using #hyperlapse

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andreii-tarkovsky:


in the mood for clean! 

andreii-tarkovsky:

in the mood for clean! 

(Source: romiaspirina, via neuadult)

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thetruthaboutcatsanddogs:

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dreams.

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Judgey water bottle

Judgey water bottle

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vandal-lies:

mvgl:

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 2x09 - “Cased Up” (November 11, 1991)

ferguson

(via alexbaca)

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filmghoul:

Night of the Comet (Thom Eberhardt, 1984)
Following Sole Survivor (which I can’t wait to see), Thom Eberhardt’s cult classic Night of the Comet is an excellent horror-comedy and a superb time-capsule of 80s California zeitgeist. One part Valley Girl parody, by way of George A. Romero’s Dawn of the Dead (1978), it is also a shockingly powerful precursor to John Carpenter’s enduring cult classic They Live (1988), in that it catapults two mundane protagonists amid end-times chaos and, most importantly, against the backdrop of 80s consumerism in a towering and oppressive Los Angeles. Its interiors are neon-lit, its skies and streets run red with blood, and all of it is suffused with the remnants of a freshly obliterated culture of arcade games, midnight movies, outlandish fashion and catchy pop music. Eberhardt gleefully documents all of this, less elegy than celebration.
With Reggie (Catherine Mary Stewart) and Sam (Kelli Maroney), Eberhardtalso offers the female counterpart to Carpenter’s various John Nadas and John Burtons. Where Carpenter deconstructs the action hero archetype by painting it as inept and goofy (see also: Big Trouble in Little China), he offers a firmly tongue-in-cheek subversion of the usually male-led end-of-the-world narrative (see: The Omega Man, I Am Legend). In placing two ass-kicking, wise-cracking and utterly lovable Valley Girl archetypes at the center of their own action movie (and the various shopping mall shootouts, motorcycle rides, zombie fistfights and explosive situations that involves) Night of the Comet appears as strikingly refreshing; a vital commentary on a stale sub-genre, and an important, gender-bent precursor to Carpenter’s biting satire of Reagan-era consumerism. Most importantly, is is a joyful and resonant film even today, and only made more relevant by the fact we haven’t seen a Night of the Comet in quite a while. 


Now on my “to watch” list.

filmghoul:

Night of the Comet (Thom Eberhardt, 1984)

Following Sole Survivor (which I can’t wait to see), Thom Eberhardt’s cult classic Night of the Comet is an excellent horror-comedy and a superb time-capsule of 80s California zeitgeist. One part Valley Girl parody, by way of George A. Romero’s Dawn of the Dead (1978), it is also a shockingly powerful precursor to John Carpenter’s enduring cult classic They Live (1988), in that it catapults two mundane protagonists amid end-times chaos and, most importantly, against the backdrop of 80s consumerism in a towering and oppressive Los Angeles. Its interiors are neon-lit, its skies and streets run red with blood, and all of it is suffused with the remnants of a freshly obliterated culture of arcade games, midnight movies, outlandish fashion and catchy pop music. Eberhardt gleefully documents all of this, less elegy than celebration.

With Reggie (Catherine Mary Stewart) and Sam (Kelli Maroney), Eberhardtalso offers the female counterpart to Carpenter’s various John Nadas and John Burtons. Where Carpenter deconstructs the action hero archetype by painting it as inept and goofy (see also: Big Trouble in Little China), he offers a firmly tongue-in-cheek subversion of the usually male-led end-of-the-world narrative (see: The Omega Man, I Am Legend). In placing two ass-kicking, wise-cracking and utterly lovable Valley Girl archetypes at the center of their own action movie (and the various shopping mall shootouts, motorcycle rides, zombie fistfights and explosive situations that involves) Night of the Comet appears as strikingly refreshing; a vital commentary on a stale sub-genre, and an important, gender-bent precursor to Carpenter’s biting satire of Reagan-era consumerism. Most importantly, is is a joyful and resonant film even today, and only made more relevant by the fact we haven’t seen a Night of the Comet in quite a while. 

Now on my “to watch” list.

(via aintgotnoladytronblues)

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"In general, I think we need to move away from the premise that being a good person is a fixed immutable characteristic and shift towards seeing being good as a practice. And it is a practice that we carry out by engaging with our imperfections. We need to shift towards thinking that being a good person is like being a clean person. Being a clean person is something you maintain and work on every day.We don’t assume ‘I am a clean person therefore I don’t need to brush my teeth.’ When someone suggests to us that we have something stuck in our teeth we don’t say to them ‘What do you mean I have something stuck in my teeth—but I’m a clean person?!’"

— Jay Smooth in his TED speech “how I learned to stop worrying and love discussing race” (via tropicanastasia)

Jay Smooth almost always a reblog

(via hello-the-future)